Shortlist symbol Add to shortlist button.

Barrow-in-Furness

With the sea on one side and the Lakes on the other, Barrow-in-Furness makes the most of its enviable location. A plethora of walking and cycling routes from the town centre provides easy access to internationally renowned wildlife sites, beautiful sandy beaches and fascinating features of historical and industrial heritage.

This Victorian town has a proud heritage of production and innovation founded on the ready availability of local coal and iron ore supplies. In the 19th century, Barrow rapidly developed into one of the major ship building towns of the country and reflected this prosperity in wide, tree-lined streets and a wealth of sandstone buildings typified by the imposing Town Hall.

For centuries Furness was part of Lancashire and being an isolated northern outpost it was left quietly undisturbed until the mid-19th century, in fact The name ‘Furness’ is derived from ‘Far Ness’ (or ‘distant headland’) – its remoteness being one of the main reasons why the monks chose to build an abbey here.

The arrival of the Furness Railway in 1846 made it much easier to transport iron ore and slate out of the area. Within 40 years, Barrow went from being a small village on a remote headland to a large industrial town with railway, docks, iron/steelworks and a thriving shipyard.
Morecambe Bay
Arnside
Arnside

Arnside & Milnthorpe

From being a quiet fishing village, Arnside began to develop as a resort in the 19th century, with pleasure boats sailing from Morecambe and Fleetwood.
Barrow in Furness
Barrow in Furness

Barrow, Askam & Dalton in Furness

This Victorian town has a proud heritage of production and innovation founded on the ready availability of local coal and iron ore supplies.
Cartmel
Cartmel

Cartmel

Cartmel is a picturesque village in the southern Lake District and is an excellent base for exploring its quaint shops, historic Priory and Holker Hall and Gardens.
Grange Over Sands
Grange Over Sands

Grange over Sands

Grange-over-Sands has long enjoyed the balmy influence of the Gulf Stream, and became a fashionable seaside resort once the railway arrived in the 1850s.
Ulverston
Ulverston

Ulverston

This festival capital of Furness combines special events with an assortment of specialist shops, cosy pubs, traditional markets and cultural hotspots.

BOOK YOUR STAY

 
Pomona Bed & Breakfast

Pomona Bed & Breakfast

Bed & Breakfast with 3 rooms, £70-£90 prpnb

Hill Crest Country Guest House

Hill Crest Country Guest House

Guest House with 3 rooms, £36-£50 pppnb

 Woodman's Cottage

Thornthwaite Farm

Self-catering with 6 units, £300-£750 pupw sleeps 1-6

Ring House Cottages

Ring House Cottages

Self-catering with 3 units, £245-£590 pupw sleeps 2-4

The Hayloft kitchen

The Hayloft

Self-catering with 1 unit, £335-£1000 pupw sleeps 6-7

Wycombe Holiday Flats

Wycombe Holiday Flats

Self-catering with 3 units, £325-£385 pupw sleeps 1-4

Longlands Farm Cottage living room

Longlands Farm Cottage

Self-catering with 1 unit, £245-£550 pupw sleeps 1-6

Sunset Cottage

Sunset Cottage

Self-catering with 1 unit, £310-£550 pupw sleeps 1-4

1 Laurel Court

Laurel Court

Self-catering with 5 units, £80-£500 pupn sleeps 1-12

Wyndcliffe

Wyndcliffe

Self-catering with 1 unit, £300-£700 pupn sleeps 6-13

Netherwood Hotel

Netherwood Hotel

Hotel with 34 rooms, £50-£80 pppnb

Howbarrow Farm Cottage

Howbarrow Farm

Self-catering with 2 units, £299-£475 pupw sleeps 1-2

Newby Bridge Country Caravan Park

Newby Bridge Country Caravan Park

Holiday Park with 8 units, £310-£680 pupw sleeps 2-4

Broughton Bank Cottage

Broughton Bank Cottage

Self-catering with 1 unit, £390-£685 pupw sleeps 1-4

Dower House

Dower House

Guest Accommodation with 4 rooms, £43 pppnb

Spring Bank Cottage

Spring Bank Cottage

Self-catering with 1 unit, £250-£540 pupw sleeps 2-6

Thornleigh Christian Hotel

Thornleigh Hotel

Hotel with 12 rooms, £45-£55 pppnb

Vilcabamba

Vilcabamba

Self-catering with 1 unit, £300-£375 pupw sleeps 4

Old Barn Cottages

Old Barn Cottages

Self-catering with 3 units, £415-£695 pupw sleeps 1-6

Greaves Farm Caravan Park - Savoy

Greaves Farm Caravan Park

Individual Caravan with 3 units, £250-£480 pupw sleeps 1-6

Greaves Farm Caravan Park

Greaves Farm Caravan Park

Holiday, Touring & Camping Park with 20 pitches, £16-£18 ptpn

The Cumbria Grand Hotel

The Cumbria Grand Hotel

Hotel with 120 rooms, £40-£100 pppnb

Black Beck Caravan Park

Black Beck Holiday Park

Holiday & Touring Park with 29 pitches, £14-£19 ptpn

THINGS TO DO

WHAT'S ON

loading...
 September 2017>
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930
loading...
There are a variety of events taking place in Barrow-in-Furness and the surrounding areas over the year. Why dont you check out the calendar and see what's on while you're here?

For events happening around the county, click below for our What's On page.

Browse All Events

Surrounding Areas

Askham-in-Furness, Barrow
Dalton Town Cross, Barrow
Walney Island, Barrow

CULTURE AND HERITAGE

Furness Abbey, Barrow
Ship in BAE, Barrow
Piel Castle, Barrow
Rampside, Barrow
Although the Romans seem to have bypassed the area, the Vikings occupied Barrow and Walney Island leaving their legacy in place names such as North Scale (from ‘skali' - Norse for summer dwelling), Biggar (from ‘bygg gar' meaning barley field) and Roa (red island).

The establishment of Furness Abbey in 1127 had a major impact on the area. By the early 13th century, the Abbey was the second largest monastery in England. Piel Castle was also used by the monks as a warehouse to store grain and wool prior to shipment overseas.

For centuries Furness was part of Lancashire and being an isolated northern outpost it was left quietly undisturbed until the mid-19th century. The arrival of the Furness Railway in 1846 made it much easier to transport iron ore and slate out of the area. Within 40 years, Barrow went from being a small village on a remote headland to a large industrial town with railway, docks, iron/steelworks and a thriving shipyard.

Expansion came about through the influence of three men: Lord Cavendish, 7th Duke of Devonshire (the financier), Henry Schneider (local iron ore magnate) and James Ramsden (managing director of the Furness Railway Company). James Ramsden then conceived the idea of using Barrow's steel to build ships and with money invested by the railway company and the Duke of Devonshire the Barrow Shipbuilding Company was formed in 1871. Two years later the company launched its first sailing vessel and started building ships for clients all over the world. Within a few years Barrow's shipbuilding industry was renowned. Over 1000 vessels, from warships to oil tankers and passenger liners, have been built here since 1873.

In 1897 the shipyard and engineering works were taken over by Vickers who ran it for nearly a century. The Company developed the model estate of Vickerstown on Walney in the early 1900s to provide homes for shipyard workers, complete with shops, churches, a farm and a park. At around the same time, a bridge was opened to link Walney with Barrow (re-named Jubilee Bridge in 1935).

Today, the steel industry has disappeared but shipbuilding is still at the economic core of the town with BAE Systems continuing to build submarines for the Royal Navy in the huge Devonshire Dock Hall that dominates the southern part of the town.
Rampside, Barrow

Like what you see? Follow us