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Coniston

Located on the banks of Coniston Water, in the shadow of the Coniston fells, the town was originally built to support the local slate quarrying and copper mining. In modern times the local area has become a tourism hotspot thanks to the idyllic scenery and stunning landscape. Fantastic mountaineering, water sports and sightseeing now contribute to a thriving local economy, which is further boosted by the consumption of local real ales!

Book Your Stay

 
Bedroom

Grizedale Lodge

Guest House with 8 rooms, £63-£160 prpnb

Yewfield Vegetarian Guest House

Yewfield Vegetarian Guest House

Guest Accommodation with 15 rooms, £60-£70 pppn, £45-£70 pppnb

Coniston Country Cottages

Coniston Cottages

Self-catering with 12 units, £295-£999 pupw sleeps 2-6

Wheelgate Country Guesthouse

Wheelgate Bed & Breakfast

Guest House with 6 rooms, £50-£55 pppn, £32-£46 pppnb

Mulberry

Mulberry, Swallows Nest & Yewtrees

Self-catering with 3 units, £350-£540 pupw sleeps 1-4

Orchard Cottage

Orchard Cottage

Bed & Breakfast with 3 rooms, £57-£90 prpnb

Elterwater Park Country Guest House

Elterwater Park Country Guest House

Guest House with 9 rooms, £36-£51 pppnb

Walker Ground Manor 5* B&B

Walker Ground Manor

Bed & Breakfast with 3 rooms, £95-£150 prpnb

Three Shires Inn

Three Shires Inn

Inn with 9 rooms, £88-£1000 prpnb

1 Far End Cottages, Coniston

1 Far End Cottages

Self-catering with 1 unit, £199-£530 pupw sleeps 1-5

Summer Hill Country House

Summer Hill Country House

Guest Accommodation with 5 rooms, £96-£124 prpnb

Oaklands Guest House

Oaklands Guest House

Guest Accommodation with 4 rooms, £38 pppnb

Ash Gill Cottage

Ash Gill Cottage

Self-catering with 1 unit, £695-£995 pupw sleeps 6

Beech Grove

Coniston Holidays

Self-catering with 2 units, £280-£650 pupw sleeps 1-4

Monk Coniston

Monk Coniston

Guest Accommodation with 37 rooms, £95-£114 pppnb, £59-£114 prpnb

The Croft

The Croft

Individual Caravan with 5 units, £285-£645 pupw sleeps 1-6

Coniston evening sunset

Thurston House & Thurston View

Self-catering with 8 units, £125-£495 pupw sleeps 1-6

Barn End Flat

Barn End Flat

Self-catering with 1 unit, £300 pupw sleeps 2-4

Shelt Gill

Shelt Gill

Self-catering with 1 unit, £290-£640 pupw sleeps 5

The Old School House

The Old School House

Bed & Breakfast with 5 rooms, £80-£90 prpnb

The Coppermines & Lakes Cottages

The Coppermines & Lakes Cottages

Self-catering with 80 units

Queens Head Inn & Restaurant

The Queens Head Inn & Restaurant

Inn with 13 rooms, £98-£168 prpnb

Kings Arms

Kings Arms

Inn with 9 rooms, £0-£50 pppnb

Howe Farm Bed & Breakfast

Howe Farm Bed & Breakfast

Farmhouse with 2 rooms, £43 pppnb

Things to do

What's on

Surrounding Area

Tarns Hows
Old man
Hawkshead

Culture and Heritage

Coniston
Brantwood
Cycling
In the 16th century, rich seams of copper ore were found in Coppermines Valley. With little local mining expertise, German miners were drafted in to work the copper veins. Peak output occurred in the mid 19th century with most of the copper taken to line the hulls of wooden sailing vessels.

Thereafter, falling prices and overseas competition started a gradual decline and eventual closure in 1915. Centuries later, copper mining has left a legacy of abandoned shafts, water courses and open workings that must not be entered.

Much of this area was formerly monastic land owned by Furness Abbey which derived its wealth from sheep farming, and iron ore mining and smelting. One of their estates was at Monk Coniston, now owned by the National Trust.

The local Herdwick sheep, from the Norse for ‘sheep farm', have distinctive grey fleeces and short, sturdy legs. Many Lakeland hill farms continue to farm this old breed as they are particularly suited to the rigours of living on the open fells.

Slate quarrying developed during the 17th century in response to increased demand for building materials, particularly roofing slates. The quarries at Tilberthwaite and on the ‘Old Man' were mined systematically for around 200 years and one or two are still in operation today.

Quarrying and mining were so profitable that in 1859 a railway was built to bring out the copper and slate. In later years, the railway brought the first tourists to the area, but was subsequently closed in 1964.

Early tourists came to marvel at the natural scenery of the area. John Ruskin, the influential 19th century writer and social reformer, also admired the local landscape, declaring that his house, Brantwood on the eastern shore of Coniston Water, had ‘the best view in all of England'.
Pony treking

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