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Arnside & Milnthorpe

From being a quiet fishing village, Arnside began to develop as a resort in the 19th century, with pleasure boats sailing from Morecambe and Fleetwood. Passengers came ashore to enjoy the promenade walks, partake of the famous salmon and shrimp teas or ride up Arnside Knott by wagonette.

Milnthorpe, on the banks of the River Bela and sitting astride the A6, is a thriving market town with a diverse range of industries. Its former port at Sandside was a busy commercial centre until the building of the viaduct silted up the estuary.
Morecambe Bay
Arnside
Arnside

Arnside & Milnthorpe

From being a quiet fishing village, Arnside began to develop as a resort in the 19th century, with pleasure boats sailing from Morecambe and Fleetwood.
Barrow in Furness
Barrow in Furness

Barrow, Askam & Dalton in Furness

This Victorian town has a proud heritage of production and innovation founded on the ready availability of local coal and iron ore supplies.
Cartmel
Cartmel

Cartmel

Cartmel is a picturesque village in the southern Lake District and is an excellent base for exploring its quaint shops, historic Priory and Holker Hall and Gardens.
Grange Over Sands
Grange Over Sands

Grange over Sands

Grange-over-Sands has long enjoyed the balmy influence of the Gulf Stream, and became a fashionable seaside resort once the railway arrived in the 1850s.
Ulverston
Ulverston

Ulverston

This festival capital of Furness combines special events with an assortment of specialist shops, cosy pubs, traditional markets and cultural hotspots.

Book Your Stay

 
The Hayloft kitchen

The Hayloft

Self-catering with 1 unit, £335-£1000 pupw sleeps 6-7

Knott View Barn

Knott View Barn

Self-catering with 1 unit, £780-£1995 pupw sleeps 1-11

Number 43 guest lounge

Number 43

Guest Accommodation with 6 rooms, £99-£185 prpnb

Wycombe Holiday Flats

Wycombe Holiday Flats

Self-catering with 3 units, £275-£385 pupw sleeps 1-4

Longlands Farm Cottage living room

Longlands Farm Cottage

Self-catering with 1 unit, £245-£575 pupw sleeps 1-6

The Cross Keys

The Cross Keys

Inn with 9 rooms, £33-£70 pppnb

Wych Elm Caravans

Wych Elm Caravans

Individual Caravan with 2 units, £295-£385 pupw sleeps 4

Wych Elm Bungalow Annexe exterior

Wych Elm Bungalow Annexe

Self-catering with 1 unit, £330-£470 pupw sleeps 4-5

Woodlands Hotel

Woodlands Country House Hotel

Guest Accommodation with 6 rooms, £49-£55 pppnb

Wyndcliffe

Wyndcliffe

Self-catering with 1 unit, £300-£700 pupn sleeps 6-13

Netherwood Hotel

Netherwood Hotel

Hotel with 34 rooms, £50-£80 pppnb

Vilcabamba

Vilcabamba

Self-catering with 1 unit, £300-£375 pupw sleeps 4

Woodlands Pine Lodges

Woodlands Pine Lodges

Self-catering with 7 units, £110-£130 pupn sleeps 1-4

Spring Bank Cottage

Spring Bank Cottage

Self-catering with 1 unit, £250-£540 pupw sleeps 2-6

Thornleigh Christian Hotel

Thornleigh Hotel

Hotel with 12 rooms, £41-£55 pppnb

Farletonview Caravan Site

Farletonview Caravan Site

Touring Park with 6 pitches, £20 ptpn

Greaves Farm Caravan Park

Greaves Farm Caravan Park

Holiday, Touring & Camping Park with 20 pitches, £16-£18 ptpn

Greaves Farm Caravan Park - Savoy

Greaves Farm Caravan Park

Individual Caravan with 3 units, £250-£480 pupw sleeps 1-6

The Cumbria Grand Hotel

The Cumbria Grand Hotel

Hotel with 120 rooms, £40-£100 pppnb

Things to do

What's on

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There are a variety of events taking place in Arnside & Milnthorpe and the surrounding areas over the year. Why dont you check out the calendar and see what's on while you're here?

For events happening around the county, click below for our What's On page.

BROWSE ALL EVENTS

Surrounding Areas

Beetham
Brigsteer
Heversham
Silverdale

Culture and Heritage

Arnside Railway
The River Bela, Milnthorpe
The Viaduct, Arnside
St Thomas Church, Milnthorpe
Anglo-Saxon sites can be found at Heversham (‘Hefresham’) and Beetham. St Peter’s at Heversham was built on the site of a monastery founded in the 7th century and contains part of an Anglo-Saxon cross shaft, while the church tower of St Michael’s at Beetham is built on Saxon foundations. Both churches administered large parochial areas stretching from Arnside to the Lyth Valley, and for centuries people had to carry their dead along so-called ‘coffin routes’ for burial. The route from Arnside to Beetham meant hoisting coffins up a narrow rock staircase known as the Fairy Steps.

Although Heversham and Beetham were the ecclesiastical centres, Milnthorpe (‘the village by the mill’) was the economic centre by virtue of its proximity to the Kent estuary and its overland links with Kendal and Lancaster. In 1280 the town gained its charter for a weekly market and annual fair, and trade flourished with numerous inns and hostelries accommodating the needs of travellers. For centuries the Bela was navigable to Milnthorpe, and port facilities developed along the river and at Sandside on the estuary. The town thrived on coastal trade well into the 19th century exporting woollen goods, leather, charcoal, gunpowder, limestone and timber, and importing coal, grain, spirits and ‘exotic’ goods such as sugar and spices until the building of the Arnside Viaduct in 1857 effectively cut off sea-borne trade for ever.

The swift-flowing River Bela also supported numerous water-powered mills further upstream, one of which was Heron Corn Mill at Beetham. Conishead Priory acquired the rights to grind corn here in 1220 – an agreement that lasted until the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1538. The mill continued in use into the 20th century, and is now a working museum that still relies on water power to turn the machinery. As well as flour production, other early industries included iron smelting at Leighton Furnace, boat building, salt making, charcoal burning and making quicklime.

The railway age also impacted on Arnside. From being a quiet fishing village, Arnside began to develop as a resort in the 19th century, with pleasure boats sailing from Morecambe and Fleetwood. Passengers came ashore to enjoy the promenade walks, partake of the famous salmon and shrimp teas or ride up Arnside Knott by wagonette. The construction of the Arnside Viaduct to carry the Furness Railway over the Kent estuary made the village even more accessible and led to a proliferation of guesthouses, many of which line the promenade today. The final chapter in the railway era came with the building of the Arnside to Hincaster branch line (opened in 1876) to connect the Furness railway with the main north−south line at Hincaster junction. Although providing a useful link between the two railways, the line became a victim of the Beeching cuts of 1963 and now forms part of a permissive footpath between Arnside and Sandside.


Limestone has not only shaped the landscape of Arnside and Milnthorpe, it has influenced the way in which people have used the land from earliest times. In 1972, the varied landscapes and habitats within this small corner of Cumbria area were recognised through designation of the Arnside and Silverdale Area of Outstanding Beauty − a body that works in partnership with other organisations to conserve and enhance the natural beauty of the area.

The Willowfield view

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